General Environment in Hell

Feb 17, 2020 by Fabrice Wilfong

Contrary to popular belief, the heat in Hell is not the main opposition to survival nor is there the constant combustion of fire. Although it is hot, Hell’s average surface heat rarely exceeds 120 degrees. This heat comes from two main sources: the ambient light from heaven that is converted into heat when it reaches the surface of Hell, and the radiated body heat from the millions of bodies Hell is composed of. Neither of these heat sources ever dissipates outside of the occlusive atmosphere of Hell, which is why the temperature reaches the heights it does. 

 

Most of Hell’s natural obstacles are due to its composition. Hell is best described as a planet residing in the void outside of heaven. Its shape is spherical due to the physics of gravity pulling equally on its mass, which also gives it the same gravitational physics you will find on earth. Although there is no star specific to Hell, there is a similar semblance of light emanating from Heaven. God’s empire sits in the center of Hell’s orbit, and Hell orbits around Heaven in roughly 111 days. Hell also has a slight rotation, as most masses of this size relegated to gravity do, which gives the impression of an earth day and night. Many in Hell believe that during the day Hell is much hotter, but this difference is only slight as the lack of any heat escaping from the atmosphere enables the temperature to be relatively homogenous.  

 

The size of Hell is a point of contention for many. It is best understood by delving deeper into is geological construction. Hell is composed of the body masses of its inhabitants; that is to say anyone who is in Hell. The composition of Hell is completely made up of human bodies in various forms of disarray and mutilation. The vast majority of these bodies have been completely absorbed by the construct of Hell. Every person who is consumed by Hell makes it that much larger, and as this happens at almost every moment of every day and night, it would be impossible to define exactly how big Hell is at any given time. For the purposes of this discussion, we can assume that Hell is roughly the size of Earth, given that over the last 3000 years the vast majority of people have been relegated there. 

 

A final note regarding the overarching constructs of Hell is this: The human remains that compose Hell, its surface, its mantel, its core, any man-made construction using its resources, as well as your own body, never decompose. This is one of your greatest assets, and the source of your most painful experiences in Hell. Blood will not congeal and will still hold its normal viscosity. Bone will remain hard, even if broken. Muscles, if not pulled apart by the strand, will still maintain their flexibility of motion and rigidness when activated. Tendons will stay elastic and translucent. Veins and capillaries will maintain their rope-like structure even if sucked dry of blood. Nerves will conduct electric impulses and therefore pain. 

 

Understand though that everyone in Hell is dead, so the function of these organs in the body for the purposes of keeping a person alive is not important. For example, you do not need to breathe in Hell, so if one were inclined to remove their lungs in order to make a pillow to rest their head, one could do so. The alveoli would maintain their soft texture indefinitely, and the individual would feel no discomfort other than that of removing their lungs from their chest. Much more detail on this subject can be found in “Your Body and How it has Changed”. 

—From “Hell Geographica”
By Doctorem Delta-Lindicus